the Biological Aspects of Rare Plant Conservation

Biotechnology and Plant Genetic Resources Conservation and Use

An extensive formal review is scheduled to occur every 10 years. These reviews and revisions are necessary for wildlife conservation as well as protection for key habitats in Nevada. Throughout the nation there is an important struggle taking place. This struggle is the fight to save wildlife and the habitat they depend on for survival. There are many partners in this struggle, including the United States Fish and Wildlife Services, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and state wildlife agencies. These entities have come together to practice wildlife conservation by developing a wildlife action plan or the Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy for each state.

Animal Zen

Monitoring the CWCS in Missouri will begin with the employment of existing inventories and surveys, which includes any monitoring done by conservation partners. Monitoring will continue with surveys, remote sensing, satellite imagery, disease and movement monitoring, breeding site survey sampling, DNA and net sampling, herpetological web site, predictive modeling, ground truthing and taxonomic affinities an reclassification. Population, habitat and project-level monitoring are also included in the Missouri CWCS as well as distribution information, length frequency distributions; community-level monitoring and replication. These performance measures provide information that pertains to conservation actions and provide for revisions to these actions if needed. The conservation action and proposed plans for GCN species and habitat monitoring occurs with help from several partners. These partners include but are not limited to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, The Nature Conservancy, The Missouri Department of Conservation, the Missouri Resource Assessment Partnership, the Missouri Prairie Foundation, Audubon Missouri, Conservation Federation of Missouri, Quail Unlimited, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Ducks Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation and the Ozark Regional Land Trust. Throughout the nation there is an important struggle taking place. This struggle is the fight to save wildlife and the habitat they depend on for survival. There are many partners in this struggle, including the United States Fish and Wildlife Services, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and state wildlife agencies. Funds are available for conserving and restoring wildlife populations throughout America for each individual state. However, before any state can receive this funding they must have developed a "wildlife action plan" better known as the Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy, by October 1, 2005.