Wildlife Fact File

Animal Rescue Foundation

The North Dakota Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy is to be reviewed annually to assess goals, actions and strategies and adjust if needed. An extensive formal review is scheduled to occur every 10 years. These reviews and revisions are necessary for wildlife conservation as well as protection for key habitats in North Dakota. Throughout the nation there is an important struggle taking place. This struggle is the fight to save wildlife and the habitat they depend on for survival. There are many partners in this struggle, including the United States Fish and Wildlife Services, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and state wildlife agencies. Funds are available for conserving and restoring wildlife populations throughout America for each individual state. However, before any state can receive this funding they must have developed a "wildlife action plan" better known as the Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy, by October 1, 2005. A wildlife action plan assesses the wildlife and habitat health, identifies any problems the wildlife and habitat face and describes the actions needed to rectify the problems and conserve the wildlife and habitat in question. Congress has identified eight elements that each wildlife action plan is required to have, which will better aid in identifying the plans of action to take and why. These eight elements are: Information on the Distribution and Abundance of Species of Wildlife; Descriptions of Extent and Conditions of Habitats and Community Types; Descriptions o Problems an Priority Research and Survey Efforts; Descriptions of Conservation Actions; Proposed Plans for Monitoring Species Identified and Their Habitats; Description of Procedures to Review the Plan; Plans for Coordinating the Development, Implementation, Review and Revision of the Plan with Federal, State, Local Agencies and Indian Tribes; and Broad Public Participation.

Plant Conservation Methods

An extensive formal review is scheduled to occur every 10 years. These reviews and revisions are necessary for wildlife conservation as well as protection for key habitats in Nevada. Throughout the nation there is an important struggle taking place. This struggle is the fight to save wildlife and the habitat they depend on for survival. There are many partners in this struggle, including the United States Fish and Wildlife Services, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and state wildlife agencies. These entities have come together to practice wildlife conservation by developing a wildlife action plan or the Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy for each state. Funds are available for wildlife conservation and restoration of wildlife populations throughout America for each individual state. However, before any state can receive this funding they must have developed a "wildlife action plan" better known as the Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy, by October 1, 2005. A wildlife action plan assesses the wildlife and habitat health, identifies any problems the wildlife and habitat face and describes the actions needed to rectify the problems and conserve the wildlife and habitat in question. Congress has identified eight elements that each wildlife action plan is required to have, which will better aid in identifying the plans of action to take and why. These eight elements are: Information on the Distribution and Abundance of Species of Wildlife; Descriptions of Extent and Conditions of Habitats and Community Types; Descriptions of Problems and Priority Research and Survey Efforts; Descriptions of Conservation Actions; Proposed Plans for Monitoring Species Identified and Their Habitats; Description of Procedures to Review the Plan; Plans for Coordinating the Development, Implementation, Review and Revision of the Plan with Federal, State, Local Agencies and Indian Tribes; and Broad Public Participation.