Plant Conservation Science Center

Animal Behavior College

As for the job outlook, the The Job Bank USA reports growth for conservation scientists and foresters will be stronger in scientific research and private sector consulting firms through 2012. As a stronger emphasis is placed upon environmental protection, these job opportunities will continue to increase. Hiring of conservationists to prepare environmental impact studies on erosion control and tree harvesting will continue through the year 2012. The salary, As reported by the Job Bank USA, the median salary of conservationists in 2002 was $50,340. Salaries in the wildlife conservation field can range from $30,000 to $70,000 per year. Entering the job field as a forester, soil conservationist or range manager, you can expect a beginning salary of $23,000 to $29,000 per year. Conservationists holding a doctorate degree may increase their beginning salary to $51,000 annually. If you enjoy the outdoors, think about a fascinating career as a "wildlife conservationist. " A wildlife conservationist works to protect the environment by protecting and managing grasslands, woodlands, mountains, rivers, coastal areas and marine habitats. As a wildlife conservationist, you will encourage communities to understand and preserve the natural environment around them. Wildlife conservationists also work to save endangered species and protect their habitats.

Wildlife Technician

Throughout the nation there is an important struggle taking place. This struggle is the fight to save wildlife and the habitat they depend on for survival. There are many partners in this struggle, including the United States Fish and Wildlife Services, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and state wildlife agencies. Funds are available for conserving and restoring wildlife populations throughout America for each individual state. However, before any state can receive this funding they must have developed a "wildlife action plan" better known as the Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy, by October 1, 2005. A wildlife action plan assesses the wildlife and habitat health, identifies any problems the wildlife and habitat face and describes the actions needed to rectify the problems and conserve the wildlife and habitat in question. Congress has identified eight elements that each wildlife action plan is required to have, which will better aid in identifying the plans of action to take and why. These eight elements are: Information on the Distribution and Abundance of Species of Wildlife; Descriptions of Extent and Conditions of Habitats and Community Types; Descriptions of Problems and Priority Research and Survey Efforts; Descriptions of Conservation Actions; Proposed Plans for Monitoring Species Identified and Their Habitats; Description of Procedures to Review the Plan; Plans for Coordinating the Development, Implementation, Review and Revision of the Plan with Federal, State, Local Agencies and Indian Tribes; and Broad Public Participation. Rhode Island had 364 aquatic and terrestrial wildlife species classified as wildlife species of greatest conservation need (GCN). Of these 364 GCN, 23 are mammals, 129 are birds, 21 are reptiles and amphibians, 34 are fish and 157 are invertebrates. Problems or threats to the GCN species populations in Rhode Island are commercial and industrial development, landfill construction or operation, dams, road construction, urban development, water diversion, municipal and industrial point source, commercial harvest, conversion of riparian forests, excessive non-commercial harvest or collection, channel maintenance and confined animal operations.