Plant Conservation Program

Plant Conservation Program

You can also replace sections of your lawn that don't grow well with gardens filled with native plants that will thrive under the growing conditions in that spot. Many of my gardens are quite wide, at least 10 to 12 feet. There is little "empty space" between my perennials. I cut down my perennials in the spring, not the fall, to provide winter interest and cover for wildlife during the cold months. As supplemental sources of cover, my garden includes a roosting box that supplies shelter to birds in the winter and a bat house. People can't survive for very long without water, and neither can wildlife. If you have a stream, pond, or fountain, lucky you! If not, you're like most suburban gardeners. If you don't have a natural (or man-made) water source, you can meet the National Wildlife Federation's water requirement with bird baths. This, however, is not the only way to supply water. Instead of spending a lot of money on expensive bird baths, I leave low saucers out in my yard, such as those used underneath plants. These collect the water when it rains.

Animal Voiceovers

A wildlife action plan assesses the wildlife and habitat health, identifies any problems the wildlife and habitat face and describes the actions needed to rectify the problems and conserve the wildlife and habitat in question. Congress has identified eight elements that each wildlife action plan is required to have, which will better aid in identifying the plans of action to take and why. These eight elements are: Information on the Distribution and Abundance of Species of Wildlife; Descriptions of Extent and Conditions of Habitats and Community Types; Descriptions o Problems an Priority Plant-Conservation-Sussex.html">Research and Survey Efforts; Descriptions of Conservation Actions; Proposed Plans for Monitoring Species Identified and Their Habitats; Description of Procedures to Review the Plan; Plans for Coordinating the Development, Implementation, Review and Revision of the Plan with Federal, State, Local Agencies and Indian Tribes; and Broad Public Participation. Illinois had 249 aquatic and terrestrial wildlife species classified as wildlife species of greatest conservation need (GCN). Of these 249 GCN species, 29 are mussels, 80 are fishes, 14 are amphibians, 23 are reptiles, 83 are birds and 20 are mammals. Problems or threats to the GCN species populations in Illinois are commercial and industrial development, landfill construction or operation, dams, road construction, urban development, water diversion, municipal and industrial point source, commercial harvest, conversion of riparian forests, excessive non-commercial harvest or collection, channel maintenance and confined animal operations.