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Plant Conservation Biotechnology Benson

Of these 669 GCN, 272 are insects, 163 are birds, 104 are fish, 53 are mammals, 21 are mussels, 19 are reptiles, 15 are amphibians, 11 are snails and 11 are crayfish. Problems or threats to the GCN species populations in Texas are commercial and industrial development, landfill construction or operation, dams, road construction, urban development, water diversion, municipal and industrial point source, commercial harvest, conversion of riparian forests, excessive non-commercial harvest or collection, channel maintenance and confined animal operations. Other problems or threats to GCN species are crop production practices, excessive groundwater withdrawal, fire suppression, management of or for certain species, channel alteration, exotic species, parasites, pathogens, recreation, grazing, predation, forestry activities and resource extraction. The Texas Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy has addressed these problems or threats to the GCN species population with wildlife conservation actions. These wildlife conservation actions include decreasing the data gap by gathering more information on GCN species, by fire management with controlled burns and with habitat protection by initiating projects to protect existing key habitat or habitat components. Key habitat restoration and improvement by initiating projects to restore or enhance existing habitats and with land acquisition by purchasing land or conservation easement that is important to GCN species are also included in the Texas Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy.

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Wildlife veterinarians washed oil from birds affected by the spill, according to a May 19 report from the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA). Louisiana state wildlife veterinarian Dr. James M. LaCour says the spill hasn't had a great impact on wildlife yet. But, with spawning and nesting season underway, wildlife are less likely to move away from danger so they can care for their young. The Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine's Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana has volunteered to care for wildlife injured from complications of the oil spill.