Animal Welfare Association

Wildlife Control Supplies

More than 350 species of birds have been spotted at Bon Secour which makes the refuge a big draw for birders young and old alike. Most frequently seen are larage numbers of ospery and heron, large birds that get lots of human response. Visitors are welcomed to walk the Pine Beach Trail that will take you through lush areas filled with all manner of plant life. Among the reasons that Bon Secour was set aside as a refuge was the desire to preserve the endangered Alabama beach mouse, a native of the dunes and to protect the habitat of a variety of sea turtles. In fact the words "Bon Secour" mean "Safe Harbor" and certainly that is what this area has now become for the plant and wild life that peacefully abide here. But as is so often the case with the formation of a refuge, there is great benefit to mankind as well.

Animal Origami

A wildlife action plan assesses the wildlife and habitat health, identifies any problems the wildlife and habitat face and describes the actions needed to rectify the problems and conserve the wildlife and habitat in question. Congress has identified eight elements that each wildlife action plan is required to have, which will better aid in identifying the plans of action to take and why. These eight elements are: Information on the Distribution and Abundance of Species of Wildlife; Descriptions of Extent and Conditions of Habitats and Community Types; Descriptions of Problems and Priority Research and Survey Efforts; Descriptions of Conservation Actions; Proposed Plans for Monitoring Species Identified and Their Habitats; Description of Procedures to Review the Plan; Plans for Coordinating the Development, Implementation, Review and Revision of the Plan with Federal, State, Local Agencies and Indian Tribes; and Broad Public Participation. South Dakota had 90 aquatic and terrestrial wildlife species classified as wildlife species of greatest conservation need (GCN). Of these 90 GCN, 28 are birds, 20 are fish, 10 are reptiles, 10 are mammals, 9 are insects, 4 are snails and 2 are amphibians. Problems or threats to the GCN species populations in South Dakota are commercial and industrial development, landfill construction or operation, dams, road construction, urban development, water diversion, municipal and industrial point source, commercial harvest, conversion of riparian forests, excessive non-commercial harvest or collection, channel maintenance and confined animal operations.