Animal Pictures

New England Plant Conservation Program

Funds are available for wildlife conservation and restoration of wildlife populations throughout America for each individual state. However, before any state can receive this funding they must have developed a "wildlife action plan" better known as the Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy, by October 1, 2005. A wildlife action plan assesses the wildlife and habitat health, identifies any problems the wildlife and habitat face and describes the actions needed to rectify the problems and conserve the wildlife and habitat in question. Congress has identified eight elements that each wildlife action plan is required to have, which will better aid in identifying the plans of action to take and why. These eight elements are: Information on the Distribution and Abundance of Species of Wildlife; Descriptions of Extent and Conditions of Habitats and Community Types; Descriptions of Problems and Priority Research and Survey Efforts; Descriptions of Conservation Actions; Proposed Plans for Monitoring Species Identified and Their Habitats; Description of Procedures to Review the Plan; Plans for Coordinating the Development, Implementation, Review and Revision of the Plan with Federal, State, Local Agencies and Indian Tribes; and Broad Public Participation. South Dakota had 90 aquatic and terrestrial wildlife species classified as wildlife species of greatest conservation need (GCN).

Plant Conservation Grants

Monitoring the CWCS in Indiana will begin with the employment of existing inventories and surveys, which includes any monitoring done by conservation partners. Monitoring will continue with surveys, remote sensing, satellite imagery, disease and movement monitoring, breeding site survey sampling, DNA and net sampling, herpetological web site, predictive modeling, ground truthing and taxonomic affinities an reclassification. Population, habitat and project-level monitoring are also included in the Indiana CWCS as well as distribution information, length frequency distributions; community-level monitoring and replication. These performance measures provide information that pertains to conservation actions and provide for revisions to these actions if needed. The conservation action and proposed plans for GCN species and habitat monitoring occurs with help from several partners. These partners include but are not limited to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, the United States Geological Survey, the United States Army, the United States Department of Agriculture, the United States Forest Service, the Federal Highway Administration, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, the National Park Service and the National Resources Conservation Service.